Hiring Practices

The Must-Have Employee Onboarding Plan for Restaurants

The Must-Have Employee Onboarding Plan for Restaurants 150 150 Sprockets

For many restaurants, first-day orientation and employee onboarding are not given nearly enough attention. Orientation is compared to the first day of college classes – syllabus day. When we consider long-term engagement and overall impact, orientation is crucial. Forking over a pile of paperwork and written instructions on what’s required just doesn’t cut it.

 

The Importance of Day One

Engaging and retaining employees is crucial to the health of growing restaurants. Benefits of effective employee onboarding include increased retention rates, reduced ramp-up time for the employee, and higher potential for an engaged employee over the course of their tenure.

Research from SquareSpace links an effective onboarding program to reduced turnover and increased retention. In one study, employees were 60% more likely to remain with the company for more than three years when there was a structured onboarding program. In another study, 15% of respondents decided to leave their current position simply due to an ineffective or no onboarding process. Simply put, people want you to include information during their hiring and first days and months that will help them succeed in the position and company.

An employee’s first day is critical to their productivity. According to Kat Cole, “new employees make their decision to stay within the first 20 to 40 hours on the job.” It’s the first impression and it can be extremely positive or extremely negative. Especially in the tight labor market of today, chances are they may have a better option waiting in the wings.

A recent trend that restaurants are seeing is both candidates and new hires who “abruptly cutting off contact and turning silent — the type of behavior more often associated with online dating than office life,” says Chip Cutter of The Wall Street Journal. This “ghosting” of employers is forcing companies to rethink how they operate and remember that recruiting doesn’t stop at the door.

 

How to Create an Effective Onboarding Plan:

If your restaurant does not have an effective new hire program in place, it may seem daunting to start now – but fear not!

First, look to your peers. Employ a committee, ranging from the GM to Shift Leaders to frontline staff. You want brand ambassadors who represent the company culture – people who enjoy their work and who will be able to provide genuine advice and coaching to new hires.

A good way to figure out what is important to incoming employees is with predictive hiring systems, like Sprockets. The hiring solution offers insights into what traits the candidate has and what they value, like gregariousness or sympathy. Knowing and understanding these traits allows you to tailor their training, onboarding, and ongoing communication in a way that will be effective to them. 

 

Once you’ve identified and engaged your internal employee onboarding team, ask questions.

Ensure you’re covering the logistics of the day and beyond with an employee onboarding checklist.
  • When will onboarding start?
  • How long will it last? (30-day, 60-day, and 90-day onboarding are most common)
  • What training will it contain? 
  • Will training include on-the-job, shadowing, or training modules?
  • Who will conduct the onboarding and training?
Answer questions concerned with the intended impact.
  • What impression do you want new hires to walk away with at the end of their first day?
  • What are the unique and important characteristics that contribute to your restaurant’s culture, morale, and productivity?
  • If any negative aspects come to mind, what does your team need to do to counteract those and shift the culture and mindsets of current employees?
Finally, create a measurement for success.

It’s important to develop a program that will be effective, efficient, and manageable.

  • How often will you check in with new hires?
  • Will you utilize surveys, or do you plan to meet with team members face to face?
  • What does feedback and data collection look like for your restaurant and for your workload?

Toxic environments are easy to sniff out, especially with the heightened senses of the newly hired. Onboarding needs to be real and tailored to your restaurant to work. Don’t paint an unrealistic picture of what a day in the life will be like. They will perceive HR and management as being either dishonest or delusional or both.

So, remember, be real and execute employee onboarding with intention. The efforts you put into recruiting and hiring do not stop when the offer is accepted. Good human resource management is a process that requires constant care and consistent reevaluation to succeed. Not to mention, it’s an anxiety-inducing day. A fun, casual environment goes a long way when making a first impression!

 

Recommended for you: Best Practices for Restaurant Hiring

A veteran in uniform

Job Boards to Attract Veterans

Job Boards to Attract Veterans 2048 1396 Sprockets

Members of the military are hard-working, driven individuals. However, they can face challenges when returning to civilian life. One problem military members face while applying for civilian jobs is the gap between military language and the verbiage of job descriptions. It’s important to remember that while the language used to describe experience may be different, the job had the same key elements. In addition, they are likely to share the same characteristics needed to succeed in a role as their civilian counterparts. For example, a military nurse could transition to the same position in a hospital, doctor’s office, or become a home health nurse. Don’t shy away from hiring military personnel! Expand your reach to qualified applicants with these tips and job boards to attract veterans. 

 

Make it Known You Want to Hire Veterans

Does your business have social media channels or an email list? Use these avenues to express your gratitude for service members and your aptitude to hire them. Social channels are a great form of free advertising for open positions. Even if you have a small following, a post that gets reshared or promoted could reach the right person!

 

Go Where the Veterans Are

When you recruit any specific group, it’s important to know where they are. If you’re hiring recent graduates, you’d want to attend college career fairs. For veterans, consider partnering with local veterans’ organizations to distribute materials or attend career fairs.

 

Job Boards

  • Vets.gov

Run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, vets.gov offers a free platform to share job openings with veterans.

 

  • HireVeterans.com

Offering job posting packages and career fairs, hireveterans.com begins their pricing at $99. 

 

  • Military.com

Primarily a news source, military.com offers a job board and career fairs for veterans. Participation begins at $95.

 

  • HireVeteransFirst.com

A free website for posting jobs, hireveteransfirst.com is a self-service platform for posting jobs directed at veterans.

 

  • RecruitMilitary.com

Boasting over one million job seeker accounts, recruitmilitary.com connects veterans with companies seeking to employ them. However, this job board is the priciest, with fees starting at $299.

 

  • Hire Heroes USA

A paid site for attracting veterans, Hire Heroes USA aims to connect veterans with companies who are willing to support their transition into the civilian workforce.

 

These job boards vary from allowing free job posts up to $200+ for job posts. Select job boards mentioned above also offer virtual career fairs, training for human resources professionals on hiring veterans, and sponsorship opportunities. Additionally, these job boards are often advertised to military spouses as well. 

 

Overall, making the effort to advertise open positions to veterans and their spouses is worth it. Using select job boards to attract veterans to your company is a great way to increase your talent pool with hard-working individuals.

Someone typing a candidate rejection letter on a laptop

How to Write a Candidate Rejection Letter

How to Write a Candidate Rejection Letter 1200 600 Sprockets

The key to a great hiring process is treating all applicants with respect. This means not only responding to the applicants you are interested in hiring in a timely manner, but extending the same courtesy to the applicants to whom you must send a candidate rejection letter.

When many restaurants today don’t bother to send a rejection letter to candidates, those that do stand out. In addition, applicants can truly appreciate when employers take the time to let them know why they didn’t get the position, whether it was already filled by the time they applied or if they don’t have the necessary experience. By leaving a positive impression on applicants, it increases their likelihood of accepting a job in the future if a position arises that they are a good match for.

In addition to maintaining a talent pool for future job openings, the benefits of maintaining a positive experience for candidates expand beyond hiring.  In fact, 60% of applicants will share their negative experiences with friends and family, according to a recent survey. But, when you offer a positive experience, even to those rejected, you’re more likely to keep them, and their friends and family, as customers.

You are free to copy and edit these candidate rejection emails to fit your own restaurant’s needs.

 

Candidate Rejection Email: First Round of Cuts

Dear [Candidate Name],

Thank you for taking the time to apply for [Position Name] at [Restaurant Name]. We wanted to inform you that we have chosen to move forward with another candidate at this time whose experience best matches our needs. 

We wish you the best in your job search.

Best,

[Your Name]

 

Candidate Rejection Email: Position Already Filled

Dear [Candidate Name],

Thank you for taking the time to apply for [Position Name] at [Restaurant Name]. We wanted to inform you that we have filled the [Position Name] position at this time.

However, we appreciate your application and encourage you to apply for future openings with [Company Name].

Best,

[Your Name]

 

Candidate Rejection Email: After a Phone Interview

Dear [Candidate Name],

Thank you for taking the time to speak with [me/Interview name] recently. We wanted to inform you that we have chosen to move forward with another candidate at this time.

Our team was impressed by your [skills, experience, goals] and we encourage you to apply for future job openings at [Company Name].

We wish you the best in your endeavors moving forward.

Best,

[Your Name]

 

Candidate Rejection Email: After an In-Person Interview

Dear [Candidate Name],

Thank you for taking the time to speak with [our team/interview name] recently. Our team was impressed by your [skills, experience, goals]. Unfortunately, we made the difficult decision to move forward with another candidate at this time.

We encourage you to apply for future job openings at [Company Name].

We wish you the best in your endeavors moving forward.

Best,

[Your Name]

 

Need help choosing candidates who will stick around and fit within your restaurant culture when hired? Learn how Sprockets’ Applicant Matching System can help you choose the right candidate for your restaurant. 

If you liked this blog, check out 10 Interview Questions to Assess Soft Skills.

Home Health Care Staffing during COVID-19: Lessons from our clients

Home Health Care Staffing during COVID-19: Lessons from our clients Sprockets

Home Health providers are no strangers to working in the face of acute outbreaks. Providers previously showed their ability to protect patients during the SARS outbreak in 2003 and again during the H1N1 pandemic in 2009. According to industry experts, home health providers should be prepared for an influx of patients due to COVID-19.

Now is one of those times where the industry, its leaders, and their staff are truly being tested. With that in mind, our team spoke with some of our home care clients about how they are handling staffing during this trying time. Our hope is these insights help owners and managers strategize for how to handle an influx of patients as well as people applying to be caregivers.

**These insights have come from conversations with owners of Home Instead, Visiting Angels, Right At Home and other home health brands nationwide.**

 

“We lost a few of our caregivers one day, and the next we saw 100s of new caregiver applicants. We are needing to be agile when it comes to hiring.”

BrightStar Care Operator in California

 

Be prepared to over-staff
Just about every owner I spoke with is increasing their hiring in preparation for some subset of their staff getting sick, needing to be out of work, or deciding they are not comfortable seeing patients. Also, with kids staying home from school, many of their caregivers are looking to reduce or rearrange shifts in order to accommodate the new normal.

Our clients are taking a page from other industries that ramp staffing during the holidays and bringing on applicants under the agreement that they are temporary for the foreseeable future. One tactic they are using is messaging all previous applicants and asking them to reapply. Previously, our team has found that 32% of previous applicants will reapply through the Sprockets platform when prompted.

 

Handling an influx of applicants
As other industries dependent on the hourly workforce scale down their staff, Home Health care locations are seeing an influx of applicants. Not all of our clients need this many staff members, but don’t want to miss out on what they are calling “an unfortunate opportunity”. When asked to explain, they helped me understand that they don’t want to miss out on quality applicants. Sourcing is not always easy in Home Health, so they want to make sure they don’t pass on an applicant that could be a great hire in the future.

What we found is these locations are still sending applicants through the Sprockets system to be scored and archived for future hiring needs. The prevailing thought is that when they need to potentially over-staff, or a staff member gets sick, they will have a group of pre-qualified applicants to call.

 

Who’s suited to provide patient care?Someone providing home healthcare to an elderly woman on the stairs

Asking a caregiver to go into someone’s home in the face of a pandemic can be just as unnerving for that person and it is for the patient that is allowing them into their home. What our clients have found is that a certain subset of their staff is not comfortable providing care during this time period.

With that said, other caregivers don’t waiver. This all comes down to the personality of the individual. What we have started to advise our clients to do, is understand the personality profile of the caregivers that are still willing to work and compare the influx of new applicants to those individuals. Home health owners are using Sprockets to help them isolate which applicants have the right mental makeup for this type of work in the climate of COVID-19.

 

Making the difficult choice
While most of the owners I spoke with are positive about how to handle staffing, some are worried about how to keep their best staff members should they need to suspend operations. Responses ranged from making choices based on past performance to simply instituting a last-one-in, first-one-out policy.

Of course, the advice our customer service team provided was to add objective data to the mix. By knowing who your top performers are, regardless of tenure, you have a better understanding of who is working well for your location.

 

Patient care and hiring will continue…
Our clients feel prepared to handle the trying times that COVID-19 has brought. They know they will continue to need quality caregivers and that hiring will remain as constant in their business as demand for in-home care. Again, our hope is the lessons our clients have taught us will be helpful to you and your business.

QSR staffing during COVID-19: Lessons from our clients

QSR staffing during COVID-19: Lessons from our clients Sprockets

QSR owners are used to making a thousand decisions a day. Quick-service has by design been built to move fast. Regrettably, the COVID-19 pandemic is outside our control and forcing us to make major changes quickly to ensure public safety as well as the longevity of our businesses.

Now is one of those times where the industry, its leaders, and our staff are truly being tested. With that in mind, our team spoke with some of our clients about how they are handling staffing during this trying time. Our hope is these insights help owners, managers, and everyone front and back-of-house regain control of staffing during uncontrollable times.

**These insights have come from conversations with owners of Taco Bell, Mcdonald’s, Chick-fil-A and other QSR brands nationwide.**

A sign that reads "NOW HIRING"

 

“People still need to eat, so we have to be prepared to keep serving!”

QSR Operator in Texas.

 

 

 

Be prepared to over-staff
Just about every owner I spoke with is increasing their hiring in preparation for some subset of their staff getting sick or needing to be out of work. With kids staying home from school, many of their staff members are looking to reduce or rearrange shifts in order to accommodate the new normal.

Our clients are taking a page from other industries that ramp staffing during the holidays and bringing on applicants under the agreement that they are temporary for the foreseeable future. One tactic they are using is messaging all previous applicants and asking them to reapply. Previously, our team has found that 32% of previous applicants will reapply through the Sprockets platform when prompted.

 

Handling an influx of applicants
As other sectors within foodservice, in particular casual and fine dining, and the hourly workforce scale down their staff, QSR locations are seeing an influx of applicants. Not all of our clients need this many staff members, but don’t want to miss out on what they are calling “an unfortunate opportunity”. When asked to explain, they helped me understand that they don’t want to miss out on quality applicants. Sourcing is not always easy in QSR, so they want to make sure they don’t pass on an applicant that could be a great hire in the future.

What we found is these locations are still sending applicants through the Sprockets system to be scored and archived for future hiring needs. The prevailing thought is that when they need to potentially over-staff, or a staff member gets sick, they will have a group of pre-qualified applicants to call.

 

A man in a pizza shopCross-training employees
As dining areas close, drive-thru and delivery sales are on the rise. Many of our clients are focusing on cross-training staff members to take on new roles. An owner of a pizza chain is using Sprockets to identify which staff members compare well to their top-performing employees in other job roles. Doing so has made it easy to know which employees to shift into various roles based on their personality as opposed to previous experience, which many don’t have. This cross-training has allowed them to keep from reducing staff hours as well as handle the influx in delivery and drive-thru sales.

 

Displaying staff preparedness to clients
QSR’s focus on customer service and thoroughness is putting the industry in a unique position to cater to our customers’ concerns. What I mean by this is we naturally take safe serve precautions in our daily routines at a restaurant and put the needs of our customers first. Now it’s crucial to communicate what we’ve always done (i.e. wash our hands, wear gloves, etc.) as a way to show the patrons that they can trust ordering from our location.

Owners are taking steps to train staff members to almost “make a show” of these routines in order to boost consumer confidence and patronage. What has always been the issue with these routines, is selecting staff members mature enough to take them seriously. The owners I spoke with are being hypervigilant in watching how staff members react and dismissing those not taking things seriously.

 

Who’s your “Hurricane Crew”?
Growing up in the restaurant industry in Charleston, SC I became very familiar with the “Hurricane Crew”. These are your staff members that have a strong sense of community and want to serve others in trying times. Taking shifts during major storms was a bit of a “badge of honor” and staff members truly felt pride in feeding the community during a recovery.

While COVID-19 will be with us much longer than a hurricane, our local clients are still taking the time to identify which staff members are willing to be part of the crew if they are forced to be short-staffed. The advice we received is to not only identify the individuals for those types of long hour grinds, but to also have an “emergency shift schedule” preplanned for a two-week period.

 

Making the difficult choice
While most of the owners I spoke with are positive about how to handle staffing, some are worried about how to keep their best staff members should a location need to shut down. Responses ranged from making choices based on past performance to simply instituting a last-one-in, first-one-out policy.

Of course, the advice our customer service team provided was to add objective data to the mix. By knowing who your top performers are, regardless of tenure, you have a better understanding of who is working well for your location. In addition, we recommended looking at how team members compared from one location to another. Our platform can identify if a middle-range performer may actually be a top performer at a different location under another GM. Our clients already use this process when routing new applicants to specific job roles or locations based on their match score.

 

Filling orders and hiring will continue…
Our clients feel prepared to handle the trying times that COVID-19 has brought. They know they will continue to need a quality staff and that hiring will remain as constant in their business as the food they serve. Again, our hope is the lessons our clients have taught us will be helpful to you and your business.

A woman being filmed to create a video for recruiting applicants

How to Create a Video for Recruiting Applicants

How to Create a Video for Recruiting Applicants 1200 600 Sprockets

Using video for recruiting applicants is an effective way to increase your applicant flow. However, in order for using video in recruiting, the contents of the video must be compelling and authentic. Use the tips below to create your recruiting video. Note that you may benefit from creating a generic company video and segmented videos for roles which you often hire.

#1 Be Authentic

Show off your real employees, not actors. You will be able to more accurately portray what people are like who work at your company and their real stories about why they like working for you. The video may also consist of an office/location tour.

#2 Have Good Video & Audio Quality

While you may not be an expert at video creation, what matters most is that people are able to clearly see and hear your message. You will want to record the video in a controlled environment when employees are speaking so that they are easy to understand. If you want to do a tour of the business, use that footage as background footage to an overview of the company narrative.

Tip #3 Be Concise

There’s no point in creating a beautiful masterpiece of a video if no one will watch it. Studies show that applicants don’t watch more than 1 ½ minutes in a marketing type video. Be sure to keep your video for recruiting applicants between 1-3 minutes to ensure your message effectively gets across while continuing to be watched.

Tip #4 Show Off Company Benefits

Does the company offer education assistance? How about 401k matching? Be sure to emphasize these benefits in your recruitment video. Not only are you trying to attract applicants, but you need them to be truly interested in the job.

Tip #5 Include a Call to Action

Your video should include a clear call to action that mimics the purpose of the video. A popular call to action for a recruiting video may be “Apply Now!”. This should be followed by where and how to apply. Whether they should apply directly on your website, emailing their resume to a recruiter, or text-to-apply, be clear.

When it comes to creating your video, you don’t need to be an expert in order to create effective materials. In fact, there are a few free and easy editing programs available to beginners. Check out a few good options below.

Free and Easy Video Editing Programs

For Mac users: iMovie
For Windows users: VSDC

 

Recommended for you: 5 Effective Ways to Use Video for Recruiting

A woman talking to a front-desk employee

Interview Questions for Front Desk Personnel

Interview Questions for Front Desk Personnel 1200 600 Sprockets

When making a new hire, it’s important to take your time to determine which applicant will be the best fit for your business. You’ll want to hire someone who understands your business and will make a good impression on your customers. Additionally, it’s important to hire people who will stick around, be a good culture fit with your business, and be dedicated to the mission. 

Being prepared with consistent interview questions is key to making the right hire. When hiring, you should ask interview questions for front desk personnel in the following categories; experience verification, behavioral, and competency questions. Additionally, you should supplement with any questions relevant to the position, such as requirements to be employed.  

If you’re looking for additional data on who to hire, learn how Sprockets’ hiring solution can help you determine which applicants are the best fit for your business.

 

Experience Verification

Experience verification is important in positions where certain certifications, training, or degrees are required. 

Q: What experience do you have in customer facing positions?
Whether an applicant has direct experience in a front desk position or relevant customer-facing positions gives an indication on their potential training and ramp up time.

Q: What relevant software do you have experience with?
Answers may include Microsoft Word, Excel, CRM systems, email platforms, and more.

 

Behavioral Questions

Behavioral questions are designed to evaluate an applicant’s fit with the role and duties it entails. You can modify these interview questions for front desk personnel according to your open position.

Q: Describe how you have handled a difficult situation with a customer/client.

Learning how someone not only copes with difficult situations and upset customers but proactively works to resolve the problem is important. Do they automatically turn to a manager or stand their own?

Q: Tell me about a time you had to “sell” the company to a potential customer or to retain a customer?

This question will give you insights on an applicant’s aptitude to be bold and sell. It’s one thing to greet customers, but another to actively work to retain them.

Q: What motivates you during the workday?

Each applicant may answer this question differently. Answers may include getting off of work in time to pick up children from school,  listening to music during a shift, or receiving a nice holiday bonus. The applicant’s answer allows you to determine which of your clients they may be the best fit to work with or if they will be a good fit for your business.

 

Competency Questions

Competency questions are designed to evaluate an applicant’s understanding of the position and the duties it entails.

Q: How do you prioritize tasks?

The way an applicant describes what their expectations of a clean house are gives you insight into whether they are detail-oriented and patient enough for this type of position.

It’s also important to weigh which category of questions is most important for that position. For example, when hiring for a caregiver, experience is very important. However, behavioral questions are always important to understand how someone will contribute to your team. When we hire people, so often do we say, “I feel like they’d be great for the job”. We base decisions off of how we feel about someone, because it is important. 

Overall, it’s crucial to hire the best people for the sake of your business and your clients. Make the best hires for your business by being prepared with the interview questions for front desk personnel above. Plus, be sure to leave time in the interview for selling your company to the applicant. If you’re ready to take your hiring to the next level, learn how Sprockets can help you select the best hires, reduce employee turnover, and save you money.

 

Recommended for you: Phone Interview Best Practices

Promoting from Within vs. Hiring Outside

Promoting from Within vs. Hiring Outside 150 150 Sprockets

You need to make a management-level hire. Do you turn to internal employees or search for external new hires? This decision can impact your business far beyond who’s better at entering data and creating spreadsheets. Who you hire impacts employee turnover, performance, and morale.

To assess both internal and external applicants for your next open position, learn how Sprockets’ hiring solution can help.

Hiring Internal Candidates

Pros:
1.) Internal candidates are already familiar with your business, meaning their ramp-up time to their new position is quicker compared to that of an external hire.

2.) Internal hires are proven to have better performance reviews in the first two years in the position compared to external hires.

3.) When you promote from within you send the message to other employees that your organization values hard work and commitment. It shows employees that the organization cares about their long-term success and wants to contribute to their career growth. This contributes to an increase in employee morale and retention.

Cons:
1.) When you promote from within you are often left with another position left to fill. Depending on the position, it may be easier to fill the management position.

2.) Hiring internally can create unnecessary competition between team members who strive for advancement. Employees may feel the need to compete with each other to get ahead instead of working together for the good of the organization.

Hiring External Candidates

Pros:
1.) External candidates can bring a wealth of new ideas and fresh perspectives to a company. They also bring their experience and best practices that the company can learn from.

2.) External candidates hired over internal candidates typically have more experience and education, which may contribute to the amount of work to which they can contribute.

Cons:
1.) External hires for the same position are paid 18-20% more than those promoted internally (Wharton, University of Pennsylvania). However, this is cited to be attributed to the increase in education and work experience that these candidates hold over their internal counterparts.

2.) When hiring external candidates, it can be difficult to gauge their cultural fit within the organization. This often results in an increase of employee turnover. In fact, external hires were 61% more likely to be fired from their new jobs than were those who had been promoted from within the firm (Inc.com).

3.) Compared to an internal hire who is already familiar with the organization and processes, a new hire must go through an initial onboarding and training period. This training period may take longer than hiring managers think. According to one study, it took two years for the performance reviews of external hires to catch up to the internal employees who got promoted (Forbes).

 

Overall, there are pros and cons to both promoting from within and hiring externally. For each position you are hiring for, it is important to weigh which option is best for the organization and team they would be working on.

Looking to fill open positions? Learn how Sprockets’ hiring solution allows you to assess which employees have what it takes to advance and which external applicants would make a great fit.

Interview Questions for Caregivers

Interview Questions for Caregivers Sprockets

When hiring caregivers, you can’t be too careful. It’s important to hire the right people not only for your clients, but for your business.  This begins with crafting the right interview questions for caregivers. These questions will help guide your decisions to only hire people who will take good care of those who are at a vulnerable time in their lives. Additionally, it’s important to hire people who will stick around, be a good culture fit with your business, and be dedicated to the mission.

Being prepared with consistent interview questions is key to making the right hire. When hiring caregivers, you should ask questions in the following categories; experience verification, behavioral, and competency questions. Additionally, you should supplement with any questions relevant to the position, such as requirements to be employed.

If you’re looking for additional data on who to hire, learn how Sprockets’ hiring solution can help you determine which applicants are the best fit for your business. Click here to learn more.

 

Experience Verification

Experience verification is important in positions where certain certifications, training, or degrees are required. In cases such as hiring caregivers, verifying experience/certifications related to CPR can be a life or death scenario.

Q: What certifications, training, and licensing do you have in the home-health field?

Asking this question helps you gauge the experience level of the applicant, which can influence confidence in the field and expected pay. You’ll want to pick up on their confidence in answering the questions and if they are/have the ability to get licensed.

Q: What are your greatest strengths as a caregiver?

This question can help you pick up on what they like about the job, what type of clients they should be placed with, and professional development opportunities for the applicant if selected for the position.

 

Behavioral Questions

Behavioral questions are designed to evaluate an applicant’s fit with the role and duties it entails.

Q: Describe how you have handled a difficult situation with a client.

This question should be posed to give insight on temperament and quick-thinking, critical skills for a caregiver.

Q: Tell me about your most rewarding experience with a client.

An applicant’s answer to this question will let you know what they like most about the job. Answers may include bonding with a client, providing emotional support, or seeing health improvements. The answer to this question may also assist you in pairing them with clients.

Q: Describe how you would handle a client who resists help.

This question will give insight into the experience level of an applicant and allows you to evaluate their problem-solving abilities.

 

Competency Questions

Competency questions are designed to evaluate an applicant’s understanding of the position and the duties it entails.

Q: What do you do if the client falls out of bed while taking care of them?
Q: How would you react if you walked into a client’s home and they were unresponsive?
Q: If you believe the client is being abused by family, what do you do?

 

In addition to the key questions listed above, it’s good to gain a sense of culture fit for your organization. Questions to probe at this include, “Where do you see yourself in three years?”, “What do you hope to get out of working with us?”, and more.

It’s also important to weigh which category of questions is most important for that position. For example, when hiring a caregiver, experience is very important. However, behavioral questions are always important to understand how someone will contribute to your team. When we hire people, so often do we say, “I feel like they’d be great for the job.” We base decisions on how we feel about someone, because it is important.

Overall, it’s crucial to hire the best people for the sake of your business and your clients. Make the best hires for your business by being prepared with the questions above. If you’re ready to take your hiring to the next level, learn how Sprockets can help you select the best hires, reduce employee turnover, and save you money.

A young caregiver and an older woman

Tips for Hiring Caregivers

Tips for Hiring Caregivers 800 534 Sprockets

With an aging population, there is an increased demand for caregivers. But, not just anyone can fill this role. Those who deal with the elderly population are in charge of another person’s life, which can’t be understated. That’s why finding the right people to fill these open caregiver roles is crucial to the safety and wellbeing of the elderly they are hired to help. Follow these tips for hiring caregivers to help ensure you hire quality employees to represent your business.

 

Inquire About Relevant Experience

While skills can be taught, it’s always important to ask applicants about their relevant experience. Even if their experience is not directly related to being a caregiver for the aging population, relevant jobs are good to know about. This can include babysitting, being a nanny, a camp counselor, or volunteer experience. Having an applicant that is familiar with the basics of the job is a good indicator that not only will they be a good fit, but that they will enjoy the position and stick around, compared to someone new to caregiving in general who suddenly realizes it’s not a good fit for them.

 

Ask Situational Questions

In the case of caregiving, it is important to ask situational questions relevant to the job they are applying to have. Asking applicants to answer with the STAR method of questions is a good format to follow, which stands for Situation, Task, Action, Result.

For example, if you ask “Tell me about a time when you were assigned a task and something went wrong” the applicant should answer with the situation they were in, the task they were assigned, the action they took to fix it, and the end result. A response example may be, “I was babysitting for a newborn and I was attempting to put her to bed. The baby would not stop crying, so I evaluated what the problem could be by going through my checklist of diaper change, bottle, being read to, and turning the sound machine on. Once I got through my list, the baby stopped crying when I put the sound machine on and went to sleep.”

The STAR answer format gives you better insight into how an applicant problem solves, opposed to a response like, “I babysitting and the baby wouldn’t go to sleep, I turned the sound machine on and they fell asleep”. 

 

Do Reference Checks

Often overlooked in the hiring process due to the speed of hiring, reference checks should be included in your hiring process for caregivers. Reference checks should include calling at least two references from an applicant’s past. While people new to the workforce may not be able to include a past employer, encourage them to submit anyone they have volunteered with or any references from school.  

 

Hire in Groups

When you hire in groups, you can more efficiently onboard new hires and get them up to speed on their position. In addition, when multiple hires are made at once, the employees can use each other as a resource, and holes in training are more easily exposed. Hiring in groups can also allow you to better pair new hires with clients, ensuring each one is best matched.

 

Conduct Background Checks

The elderly population is vulnerable to abuse and neglect, which includes actions like physical abuse, not being fed, getting stolen from, and more. Whenever you are hiring someone for a caregiver position, it is essential to conduct background checks. Background checks should include verification of any certifications/relevant education, history of violence or theft, and an applicant’s credit score. 

Overall, hiring for caregivers should be a well-planned process to ensure the best people are chosen for your business and clients. Going through relevant experience, situational questions, reference checks, and background checks can help ensure you make the best hire. Once you’ve determined you are interested in a few applicants, consider hiring in groups to increase your onboarding efficiency. 

Plus, learn how the use of pre-hire assessments can help you determine who has the right mental makeup to work as a caregiver for your business. Learn how Sprockets is helping other home care business owners hire great people for their business.

 

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