Hiring Practices

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How to Execute a Great Candidate Experience

How to Execute a Great Candidate Experience 1200 600 Sprockets

The days of leaving candidates waiting for a response to their application or their status in the hiring process are long gone. A poor candidate experience not only turns applicants away, it can spread, to deter even more job seekers away from your company. The best candidate experience considers every connection during the process, optimizing each step along the way.

 

Step 1: Before They Apply 

Your online presence is critical to attracting candidates, but too often businesses neglect to keep it positive and current. A recent study revealed 83% of job seekers will research a company before applying. They’re evaluating what a company does, what it stands for, and how it has treated applicants in the past. It’s a sad commentary that the majority of job seekers, 60%, have had a negative candidate experience. It can be devastating to the hiring process to learn that of those 60%, 72% have posted negative comments on social networks and job sites like Glassdoor. Negative comments are costing you talent. Stay current with your online presence: encourage positive comments and work to correct any negative remarks to keep job seekers interested and excited about joining your ranks.

Step 2: During the Application Process 

Job seekers are looking for an application process that’s fast, easy, and intuitive. In a recent survey, 55% of job seekers admit to abandoning up to five applications during their search. Length and complexity may add to their frustration: keep it short and simple. Mobile applications today are a must. Over 90% of applicants use their phones to find open positions. A website that’s mobile-friendly captures their attention and application immediately.

If your job application process directs candidates to a job page on your site, make sure it’s easy to use and puts your company in the best possible light. A short process is a must, but many companies don’t take the opportunity to market their recruitment and employer brand. The majority of sites, 59%, do not include content that explains why a job seeker would want to work for them. Every touchpoint in the application process is an opportunity to boost your brand. Including the plusses of working with you can net more applications and hires in the job description. Utilizing predictive hiring solutions ensure you make the right decision — the first time around.

Step 3: Scheduling the Interviews 

Candidates are looking for an immediate response to their application and an HR professional who acts quickly to pre-screen and schedule moves ahead in the talent wars. Businesses shouldn’t play phone tag with applicants and department heads to put everyone in the same room. Scheduling software simplifies the hiring process, allowing applicants to pick a time that works for them when all the relevant shareholders are available. Scheduling platforms save time and emphasize your company is tech-savvy. Easy to schedule interviews aid in creating a positive candidate experience.

Step 4: Continuing Communication 

Constant contact with prospects is key. A new trend, ghosting employers, has been on the rise. One study found 41% of applicants believed it was reasonable to simply stop communicating with an employer during the hiring process. 48% of applicants thought it was necessary to do so in the earliest stages. Establishing a relationship with a candidate translates that you’re interested and excited to have them meet with you. The more you connect with applicants during the hiring process the more opportunity you have to boost your employer brand and the less chance you have of being ghosted.

Step 5: Speak Their Language 

When you know the traits and characteristics you’re looking for in a new team member, it’s easier to appeal to those strengths during the interview process. The candidates you’re interviewing are thoughtful and methodical: provide them with step-by-step details of your process, giving them the structure they need. If you’re interviewing for an outgoing, communicative role: make sure you include extra time to chat when you connect with them. Tech candidates may be more relaxed speaking virtually. Speaking to their strengths shows you understand who they are and what they bring to the table.

Step 6: Deliver on Promises 

Once a candidate has begun the application/interview process, it’s important for a business to meet its deliverables: if you say you’re going to call, make sure you do. Job seekers who were given feedback on interview day were 52% more likely to continue their relationship with a potential employer. That included reapplying with the company, referring friends, or even making purchases from them. Let job seekers know how they’ve done. Also, let them know what the next step(s) will be and when they can expect to hear from you. Be sure to make good on all your promises.

Step 7: Fill in Lag Time 

For some jobs and employers, a job offer on the spot is routine. For others, it’s just not possible to do so. But while you’re waiting for reference checks or other lags between interviews and offers, keep the lines of communication open. Stay in contact with the candidate by sending information about benefits and perks or arranging coffee with potential colleagues. If you believe they’re a strong candidate, keep reinforcing you’re excited about bringing them on board. Anything you can do to keep their interest and boost your brand can help convert a candidate to a new hire.

Candidate experience is critical to attract, recruit, and convert top talent. The best job seekers in today’s tight market are examining every point of contact along the recruitment process. They’re evaluating your company as much, if not more, than you’re evaluating them.

A positive candidate experience reflects a positive employee experience. Job seekers want to work for a company that responds to their needs and wants. If your experience for candidates reflects those core values, you’ll net top talent for every job you post.

Final Step: Beyond the Right Hire 

Once you’ve found the best candidate for the job, work hard to keep them on board. Keeping new hires (and everyone) happy at work begins with respect. One study revealed encouraging employees to identify and build on their unique attributes and strengths was critical to employee satisfaction. 


Sprockets is a predictive hiring system designed for small and large businesses alike. With unlimited predictive assessments for only $99/month, you can’t afford to miss out. Learn how Sprockets can assist you in matching the right hire to your company.
College students

Best Practices for Hiring College Students

Best Practices for Hiring College Students 733 602 Sprockets

A growing amount of the labor force is comprised of recent college graduates. From sales jobs to specialized industries, college students and graduates are looking for all types of opportunities in their job search, and they are often more flexible than those already in the workforce. Read on to learn the best practices for recruiting and hiring college students and other young talent.

Post on College Job Boards

LinkedIn, Indeed, and Ziprecruiter are a few of the most common job boards. To set your job openings apart, try posting on college job boards. An extra step is to look beyond your local colleges when you post on job boards. One survey revealed that 77% of new graduates would be willing to relocate for their first job – and a significant 29% would be willing to move anywhere.

Attend College Career Fairs

Campus recruiting involvement typically means attending a college career fair. Career fairs are a great way to meet a mass amount of college students at once. Meeting face-to-face gives you an extra perspective on their level of interest.

After the career fair, plan on staying in the area for a few days. During this time, meet with any promising candidates who approached you at the career fair. This is a great way to show immediate interest, stand out from the other companies at the career fair, and streamline your process for hiring college students.

Connect with Relevant Campus Organizations

Getting in touch with student organizations on a college campus is a great way to connect with engaged students. Are you looking to fill a marketing position? Try connecting with the college’s local AMA chapter to speak at a meeting. Most, if not all, colleges have a list of their student organizations along with the President of the organization with their contact information. This is a great way to provide value, advertise for your company, and meet involved and engaged potential candidates.

Extend Your Social Media Outreach

Look beyond simply posting on LinkedIn. Try sponsored ads on Instagram, Twitter, and other social media platforms to meet college students where they’re at. Social ads also allow more creativity than a typical job posting, which helps your brand shine and show off your culture. Check out these creative Instagram job ads for inspiration.

Ensure that your company shows off your culture on social media platforms when possible. In fact, 75% of millennials say they would take a pay cut to work for a socially responsible company.  76% consider a company’s social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work.

Try New Platforms

As the labor market tightens, job boards are getting more and more specialized. The job boards below are intended for recruiting college students.

Handshake: Enables you in recruiting and hiring college students from their 650 university partners, ranging from Carnegie Mellon University to Princeton to Michigan State. Handshake features multi-school posting, career fair management, and an integrated network.

Tallo: Allows talent seekers to engage with over 500,000 students who are either in high school or college registered on Tallo, perfect for companies who may not require a college degree to get started. Tallo features direct messaging capabilities, lets you know when students have viewed your company’s profile, and lets you search based on career interests, experience, location, and more.

Aftercollege: Features 2,970 schools with registered users and lists job and internship opportunities. Utilizes machine learning rather than a keyword search. Job postings go on the website and are distributed to relevant university career networks.

Consider Soft Skills Over Work Experience

While college students may have some summer internship experience, volunteer roles, or extracurricular activities, but not all students have had those opportunities. Taking soft skills and passion into account can be more important than their experience.

An effective way to test for soft skills is through a pre-hire system or predictive hiring solution. One great predictive hiring system is  Sprockets’ Applicant Matching System (AMS). These tests are able to identify the personality traits and mental makeup of a candidate and determine whether they are a good match for your company.

Develop an Effective Talent Pipeline

If your company doesn’t already have an internship program, whether paid or unpaid, it is an effective talent acquisition pipeline for finding job candidates when full-time positions open up for hiring college graduates. Also, consider adding internship opportunities during the school year if you are close to a college campus. Many students have flexible schedules or days off during the week, making them able to add on an internship.


Learn how Sprockets’ predictive hiring solution can help you identify matches based on soft skills, streamline your hiring process, and onboard the best team members.

7 Steps to Building a Great Hiring Process

7 Steps to Building a Great Hiring Process 150 150 Sprockets

As top executives in a company, we understand that it takes top people to make things happen. The right person can make a project exceptional. To get exceptional people, it is imperative to have an exceptional recruitment process. There are several ways to ensure that a hiring process brings in top talent. I would love to provide you with some guidelines and resources to take your recruitment to the next level.

Step 1: Understand Your Company’s Needs

As an executive of many years, I have learned that the most important part of a recruitment process is first and foremost to understand my needs as a company. I must determine which candidate skills are critical and which are only nice to have. In some instances, phone support is required. In addition to technical expertise, I will require a candidate that excels at customer service. Perhaps I need to bring in young talent, with fresh ideas and the latest technical know-how. Or, perhaps I am looking for an experienced legal professional that knows the ins and outs of all legal matters on a particular topic. Whatever the role, I always take the time to brainstorm on what key factors I am looking for in order to make the best hiring decision. With new technology on the market, predictive hiring systems offer a cost-effective way to determine which skills are needed to succeed in a role.

Step 2: Craft a Detailed Job Description

The next step in the hiring process is to write a detailed and engaging job description. The right candidate will be motivated by engaging work and strong direction. I always want my employees to be excited to come to work every day. There is no better motivator than simply loving your job. Also, be sure to know and understand the role for which you are hiring, or consult someone who does. You want to put as much detail as possible in the job posting and title to get the right individuals to apply.

Recruiters will use details in the description as ammunition to collect resumes from the right individuals. Also, it never hurts to come across as friendly and human in the job description. This will help draw in the candidate that truly enjoys working. Finally, be sure the job description is clear. Clarity is a key to success.

Step 3: Define Success for the Position

When filling the role, define what success will mean for that particular job description. No candidate will be perfect, but I always make sure to clearly define my major expectations for the position. Perhaps success means driving a particular amount of sales. Other measures of success might include a specific number of deliverables to be completed within a particular period of time. Whatever success means for that particular position, I always ensure this is properly communicated to my recruiter, hiring manager, human resources, and the individual candidate.

Step 4: Creating an Effective Talent Pipeline

An effective talent pool comes from building a talent pipeline. This might mean reaching out to a local college to hire graduating students. Or, it might mean teaming up with a training website such as cybrary.it to find talented professionals studying in their spare time. A company career page or job board might be a good start as a recruitment strategy, but it is even better to promote word of mouth through employee referral programs. I like to make sure the company career page reads like an advertisement. It is a great opportunity to convince the right talent that they want to work for my company. Some fun things to include might be photos or videos and fun employee facts. Also, make sure that your career page is mobile optimized and that it is easy to apply so prospective talent is not frustrated by the hiring process. Job boards such as indeed are an important part of recruiting technology and are a good way to drive traffic to the site and increase visibility to prospective candidates. I don’t always assume more is better. Picking the right site will reduce the extra noise and provide quality job seekers rather than quantity.

Step 5: Determine Your Interview Crew

When conducting interviews, it is important to determine who will conduct the interview and how they will conduct it. For positions with many applicants, I might utilize a phone interview as a way to screen candidates before meeting them in person. This helps a hiring manager to find any glaring issues and determine that the candidate meets all the base criteria. This might include location, willingness to travel, the capability to lift, a specific degree or background, etc. It is also a good time to set expectations for compensation.

For qualified candidates, it may be critical to have the hiring manager take the call or a heavily technical associate as opposed to a human resources representative. This will ensure that technical skills can be appropriately evaluated. Including additional personnel in the hiring process allows for many perspectives on a potential candidate. For instance, it may be useful to include a sales manager as well as a member of the engineering team when evaluating a candidate for a technical sales position.

Step 6: Streamline the Interview Process

Onsite interviews should be heavily structured to make them as efficient as possible. I always establish what I am looking for in a candidate before the interviews begin and review this criteria with all staff involved with hiring. I want to be sure to reduce any unconscious bias on the part of the interviewer. Don’t just address the technical skillset. Make sure to identify if a candidate will fit in with the culture, is able to communicate effectively, and is proactive in addition to meeting any technical skill sets. Be sure to standardize questions among applicants to enforce objective comparison. Be cautious, however, to make sure the conversation still flows naturally. When deciding on personnel, only one person should be responsible for the final say on a candidate however, get feedback from all involved. Be sure to gather thorough reference checks on all candidates.

An applicant tracking system is an important part of the human resources process that may also help to create a repeatable process that is scalable among large applicant pools. It can send interview dates and times direct to the interviewer’s calendar and provide guidance on what they should look for in the candidate. Questions can also be provided directly to the interviewer from the application.

Step 7: Move Quickly on Job Offers

Be sure to move fast on offers to candidates so that other companies cannot jump in with a competing offer. A fast-paced offer makes it clear that you are excited to have them join the company. Deliver the offer slowly and gauge the reaction of the candidate on each portion. It is sometimes helpful to use questions to uncover any reservations the candidate might have at the time of the offer.

A paramount part of the hiring process is the speed of hire. It is important to monitor the overall time to hire. This includes the time a candidate is first engaged until the final offer. Recruiting technology can assist in this process. Often I use web generated analytics to create background reports on all key metrics. I believe it is important to keep in mind that the top candidates are always evaluating my company as I am evaluating them. It is also important to try and make each experience as positive as possible. It is always valuable to get feedback from all potential hires on their overall experience.

Be sure to take the time to improve your overall human resources process by taking advantage of both recruiting technologies as well as process improvements such as the ones listed in this article. These steps will make all the difference in hiring the right candidate and will ultimately lead to success in business. I wish you luck in your future hiring endeavors.


Sprockets offers a predictive hiring solution designed to help human resource professionals and small businesses make their best hires. Learn more about how Sprockets can aid in matching the best hires to your company’s needs and cultures.

A woman smiling and text reading "The Definitive Guide to Hiring Top Talent: Riia O'Donnell"

How to Recruit and Retain Top Talent

How to Recruit and Retain Top Talent 1744 703 Sprockets

Businesses’ most important asset and highest risk can be the talent they attract and retain. The market may make it harder or easier to hire, but no matter what the conditions, your job is to acquire the best talent your company can find.

The best recruitment strategies require a deep knowledge of company needs; how the top performers currently on staff are providing for those needs; and what can be done to acquire more talent just like them.

Riia O’Donnell lends her insight in her E-Book, The Definitive Guide to Hiring Top Talent.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Modern Hiring Process
  • Preparing for Successful Interviews
  • Specialized Interview Questions
  • Creating a Positive Experience for Candidates

Download the E-Book by Completing the Form:


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The Ultimate Startup Hiring Guide

The Ultimate Startup Hiring Guide 725 482 Sprockets

In today’s world, many entrepreneurs have decided to pursue their dream of running their own business. If this is the case for you, you’ve probably started thinking about how to optimize your hiring process. Luckily, the process of finding and hiring the right people doesn’t have to be as tedious and time-consuming as it may sound. To make the process as effective and expedient as possible, predictive hiring solutions and specialized strategies help with startup hiring. 

 

1. Utilize Employee Assessment Resources.

When you start your startup hiring process, make sure that you utilize employee assessment resources. These resources will empower you to determine which candidates are most likely to function effectively in their given roles and as team members. The most effective employee assessment process will involve the company’s current staff members completing the assessments first. Once this happens, the companies that administer the test can determine which shared attributes or skills the individuals who are most successful with the company have. After making this determination, you or the employee assessment company can carefully screen incoming candidates to determine which staff members would function most effectively in specific positions.

Sprockets, an HR tech company, offers predictive pre-hire assessments. Of their many features, Sprockets can help you decide if the candidate will be successful and fit into the company’s culture.

2. Hire Based On Potential, Not Just The Candidate’s Track Record.

If you’re serious about your startup’s hiring process, seek out candidates who seem to have potential. While existing skill sets and track record is important, these don’t provide you with the full picture of everything a job candidate can be. In reality, factors such as educational opportunities, existing social networks, and self-concepts can subtly impact whether an employee has had high performance in their work settings thus far. Recognizing your ability to provide them with the necessary support and resources can positively impact productivity and results. Consider whether the employee may be able to take your organization into a deeper dimension of success.

In some cases, it might be difficult to identify factors that indicate that a specific employee has potential. One thing to consider is work ethic. In many cases, an employee may not have all of the skills or capabilities you’re looking for. Nevertheless, they work hard and are willing to learn new things as quickly as they can to help push the company forward. Another thing to consider when attempting to gauge the potential of a job candidate is general life outlook. Is the candidate generally positive, negative, or somewhere in between? In many cases, individuals who maintain a positive outlook are more effective in dealing with setbacks, constructive criticism, and disappointments. Because all of these things are integral, being able to grapple with them while still working effectively is imperative for those who want to excel in the vocational setting.

3. Look For Flexibility.

While there are many attributes that would make an employee the ideal fit for a startup, flexibility is probably at the top of the list. For example, with many startups, the employee may need to put in 14 hours one day and 4 the next. Also note that startups tend to operate with smaller staffs and are often fast-paced. An employee may be required to jump in and complete tasks that aren’t in their job description. Flexible people can do this type of thing with a substantive level of competence and confidence, so look for this type of individual when you’re ready to hire.

4. Enhance Your Interview Process.

Another strategy you should implement to optimize the hiring process is enhancing your interview process. This approach is important because the interview is the time for you to learn as much as possible about a specific job candidate. By asking the right questions, you can gain the information necessary to determine whether a particular candidate would be ideal for the position.

Note that there is a wide range of questions that you’ll want to ask during the interview process. Some will be personal while others will pertain directly to the job the candidate is applying for. Still, others will concern the work the candidate completed in other positions. Ask questions that give you a sense of the other party’s character. This is important since you will be working closely with them.

Some of the questions you may want to consider asking during the interview include:

• What is your understanding of what our company does and why we were founded?

• Are you familiar with the roles and responsibilities for the job you’re applying to?

• Describe your biggest work-related fault? Have you done anything to correct it?

• Do you consider yourself to be introverted, extroverted, or somewhere in between?

• What is your most significant job accomplishment, and why is it important to you?

In addition to asking the right questions during the interview process, make sure that you consider the value of having a co-worker sit in with you during this component of the hiring journey. This step is effective because even the most objective employer will have blind spots. Blind spots can include favoring certain candidates over others. Pre-existing prejudicial assumptions about individuals can cause hiring managers to pick someone who isn’t truly ideal for the position. Consider the value of asking a trusted co-worker to be present when you conduct the interview. Then request their honest feedback.

Conclusion

If it’s time for you to do some technical hiring, it’s important to have a game plan in place. Rather than allowing the process to unfold in an entirely organic manner, utilize some of the strategies and systems outlined above. You will increase your likelihood of bringing the most best-matched candidates on board this year!

Learn how Sprockets can help with your startup hiring.

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Assess Soft Skills with Interview Questions

Assess Soft Skills with Interview Questions 1430 936 Sprockets

When you think of the perfect employee, what traits come to mind? Soft skills including being personable and hardworking or hard/technical skills like data entry and phone skills? Most managers would say that their top-performers have a mix of both soft and hard skills that match the department that they’re in. Taking time to assess soft skills, in-person and with predictive hiring tools, during the hiring process is crucial.

However, taking time to assess soft skills can difficult when you only have a brief interview. In fact, over 60% of hiring managers agree that screening for soft skills is tough and 92% rated soft skills as a critical priority. Below are a few tried and true interview questions for measuring the most prevalent soft skills.

Communication

Whether you are hiring a software developer or a sales representative, communication is essential to thriving in any company culture. While a software developer may mainly work alone, they must be able to communicate with clients effectively and internally communicate deadlines and information needed for each project to be successful.

  • Tell me about a time you needed to get information from someone who wasn’t very responsive. What did you do?

  • Can you walk me through your process of explaining a new topic to someone who is unfamiliar with it?

Teamwork

Being a team player is important in having a collaborative work environment and a team that gets along well. If you have a majority of employees with positive attitudes and one person with a negative outlook, it can bring the whole team down. Assessing social skills without the future team in the room is difficult. Use these questions to assess if the candidate will be a good match.

  • Do you enjoy working on a team or on your own? Why?

  • How would you react if a team leader encouraged competition between team members instead of collaboration?

  • Can you tell me about a time when you had to work with someone you were not compatible with?

Leadership

Whether you are hiring for a managerial position or an entry-level position, it can be beneficial to assess whether someone is capable of being a successful leader down the line in their initial job interviews. This includes having people skills and certain personality traits that make up good leaders.

  • Can you tell me about a time when you successfully led a group through a difficult situation?

  • Describe a time you were able to improve the performance of a team or team member?

Critical Thinking

Problem solving by using critical thinking skills is something that is developed since elementary school. However, some people have better critical thinking skills than others – and simply enjoy it more. 

  • Tell me about a time when you were asked to do something you had never done before. How did you approach it and what did you learn?

  • Tell me about a time you had to make a decision with incomplete information or your manager was not available.

Adaptability

From time management skills to prioritizing a busy, hectic schedule, being able to adapt to different circumstances is essential in today’s busy world. Not only do candidates need to be adaptable under different working styles, but also adaptable in terms of being resilient when a project or idea does not go their way. Adaptability can be a difficult soft skill to assess in-person. Predictive hiring systems can help by revealing a person’s mental makeup compared to that of top performers.

  • Tell us about a time when things didn’t go the way you wanted— like a promotion you wanted and didn’t get, or a project that didn’t turn out how you had hoped.

  • Tell me about your last project. What worked and what didn’t work well?

Culture Fit

Does your office boast a glass door policy, an air-hockey table, or unlimited PTO or cubicles, structured retirement plans, and professional development opportunities? Each culture is the right fit for a certain candidate. Finding the candidate that matches your company culture is important for employee engagement, productivity, and retention.

  • Describe a time when you took a risk for the sale of a principle, value or mission?

  • In what type of work environment are you most productive and happy?

  • What management style do you thrive with?


While assessing soft skills can be difficult, Sprockets’ predictive hiring solution helps. With the combination of psycholinguistics and artificial intelligence, Sprockets is able to analyze the mental makeup of candidates — before you even meet them. Sign up for a free account today.

Sources: LinkedIn.com | Forbes.com

Best Job Boards for Employers

Best Job Boards for Employers 150 150 Sprockets

Want to speed up the hiring process? Online recruitment tools and predictive hiring systems offer the best way to find top talent. While there are thousands of job sites out there, finding new candidates that are qualified and skilled is the most important part of recruitment. You want to find job boards that pull in candidates from fields related to your industry as well. Hiring managers and recruiters can also use niche job sites to find highly qualified candidates. Most of the time, industry-specific job boards are going to be the best and fastest way to find the top talent.

Regardless of where you source talent, Sprockets is a great predictive hiring tool to administer personality assessments. Sprockets Boost connects your ATS systems, job boards, and email providers to Sprockets giving you more data than ever before to make awesome hires.

Popular Recruitment Sites

If you’re a recruiter, you are likely on all of these job search boards below. However, not all of them are created equal. Some of these rake in thousands of candidates that never have the experience or quality you are looking for. We chose a few that we like the best:

  • Indeed
  • LinkedIn
  • SimplyHired
  • Ladders
  • Monster
  • ZipRecruiter
  • Handshake
  • CareerBuilder
Indeed

This is one of the largest job sites on the Internet currently. One of the best things about this site is the employer dashboard functionality. You can quickly set up new applications, view submissions, and contact recruits all through your dashboard on your browser or phone. It’s very effective to find and choose the right candidates with Indeed, and you include certain restrictions so that you don’t get an influx of poorly qualified candidates. However, Indeed isn’t free, and it will cost you to use some of their premium recruitment features.

LinkedIn

Most recruiters already know about LinkedIn, but they may not be taking advantage of its full potential. LinkedIn has job listing and search capabilities, which will help you find a number of candidates in your area. However, the true beauty of this platform is networking. By posting your application on your feed, you can bring in more talent through your contacts. You can also join groups and follow people who are in your industry, sending them contact requests when you have a recruitment opportunity.

SimplyHired

If you are simply looking to see all of the candidates possible in your area, aggregated from a multitude of job sites, then SimplyHired is a great bet. It will give you a lot of views, allowing you to search resumes by keyword and location. For those who want to cherry-pick based on skills and experience, this is a great way to find new talent.

Ladders

For those seeking top talent in any industry, Ladders is a new site that boasts over 10 million members. Most members on Ladders have a bachelor’s degree or better, and they make $149,000 or more per year. Ladders also doesn’t just provide a resume. Recruiters also get to see the candidate’s aspirations and contact details based on their profiles. If you want high-level, executive talent, this is where you will find it.

Monster

Everyone has heard of Monster in the past 10 years. It’s one of the oldest and most marketed job board sites. With Monster, you will find all types of talent, but it’s well known for having a ton of search and sort capabilities. For recruiters who want to find talent in a specific city, you can search by most recently added to find top candidates each week. You never know who could be looking to get into a new position.

ZipRecruiter

The great thing about this website is the matching system. You can use a job description template to create a quick application, then with a single click, you can get instantly matched with 100 more candidates. In addition, 80% of employers who post a job on ZipRecruiter will receive a high-quality candidate within the first day. You can see all of their resume and profile details in your dashboard as well. When you’re ready, you can invite for an interview with a quick template or send a personal message through the interview scheduler.

Handshake

Handshake is another social network that looks as friendly as Facebook but actually operates like LinkedIn. You can customize your applications, send out invitations, and receive candidate matches instantly. The website is especially friendly for college students and young talent, so if you have an internship available or want some highly motivated talent, this may be the best way to find your candidates. You can also use their mobile app to find candidates on the go.

CareerBuilder

Many job applicants use CareerBuilder first due to its resume tools and job search. You can use it as an employer to quickly find matches for your job based on keywords. CareerBuilder is a great option for recruiters because you can post listings, check out new resumes, and see references all in the same place.

Industry-Specific Job Boards

There are a lot of sites on the web that are also made to find niche talent. These are sites for web developers, designers, college internships, artists, finance, sales, and more.

CollegeRecruiter.com: When you are seeking candidates for entry-level positions and internships, this site can find you great talent. Just post your listing and instantly get matched with college graduates.

CoolWorks.com: If you are recruiting for outdoor jobs, such as national park workers, sir tutors, temporary, seasonal, and full-time jobs, then this is the site for you. Experienced farmers, ranch hands, construction contractors, and resort workers are among the talent you’ll find here.

EfinancialCareers.com: You can use this site to post all of your financial-related jobs in 35 different niches, including asset management, hedge funds, quantitative analytics, banking, trading, corporate banking, and of course, accounting.

Engineering.jobs: This site works well to find the top engineers in an area where you want to hire. You can find candidates by engineering specialties, previous work experience, titles, and skills.

Remote.co and Remoteok.io: If you are looking to find talent in tech, this is a great place to start. While you can only post your application here, you’ll be able to find talent from all over the world, and they can apply for your position right through the website.

HealthcareJobsite.com: Seeking medical professionals? This is the site where you can find physicians, nurses, technicians, and all kinds of other support help within the healthcare sector.

Idealist.com: For the non-profit sector, this is where you can find volunteers, full-time help, and internship candidates. However, the key here is that you can search by specific niches.

Differences Between Job Search Engines & Job Boards

Job boards are great places to post and advertise current positions for candidates. They can search your listings based on title, keyword, job description, and location. In most cases, job boards allow these candidates to make profiles with resumes that employers can also browse, allowing you to recruit on the website. Typically, there is a small cost to recruit on these websites, however.

Job search engines are a little different because they aggregate everything and put it in one place. Recruiters can use job search engines to see what employers are looking for, as well as post listings to see who is applying for these jobs. Most online recruitment sites are a mixture of a job search engine and a job board.

Final Word

Recruiting online is so much easier when you have all the right tools at hand to deliver high-quality candidates. Recruiters can guarantee better prospects by using assessment software and recruiting technology to weed out the wrong candidates. This way, you don’t waste all of your time and effort on candidates who aren’t right for the company culture or don’t have the skills needed.

 

A Positive Candidate Experience is Key in Hiring Quickly and Efficiently

A Positive Candidate Experience is Key in Hiring Quickly and Efficiently 150 150 Sprockets

Many companies miss the most important part of the hiring process – the positive candidate experience.

A 2018 report by Human Capital Institute backs this with some staggering statistics:

  • 60% of job seekers reported a negative experience with employers

  • 72% of job seekers reported posting a negative review online regarding their experience with the employer.

  • 55% of job seekers report avoiding certain companies after reading negative reviews online.

Your company brand and hiring process could be scaring away your best employees before they even apply! Thankfully, there are some simple ways to turn this around. From predictive hiring systems to simplifying the process, these strategies are proven to help. For more information on executing a great candidate experience, check out this blog.

1. Research your company as a candidate.

Simple as that. Start a job search for a current opening in your company. Take note of how easy it is to find your openings. Read reviews from employees/candidates about your company and your process. Take a look at your company website and career page to ensure they are attractive, informative, and inclusive.

2. Communicate.

Keep candidates informed of where they are in the process. A personal email thanking them for their application is ideal. This can be done manually or setup as an automatic notification in most applicant tracking systems. Don’t leave candidates guessing the next steps. If a candidate is brought in for an interview, provide a timeline of when a decision is expected to be made and if a position is closed, make sure all candidates who applied are notified.

3. Simplify your application process.

Complete an application to get an idea of how long the process takes. According to a study done by Paycor, applications that take over ten minutes to complete, businesses can experience a 50% drop off rate! Make your application short and to the point. Include other options for completion, such as resume parsing, mobile-friendly, and remove the need for accounts to complete an application.

4. Review your job descriptions.

Your job description is the candidates peek into a day working for your company. Make it informative, appealing, and personable. Ensure the requirements you are listing match the actual position. Many companies lose out on great candidates by requiring years of experience for an entry level role.

Push out a campaign to have employees complete reviews on popular boards such as Indeed and Glassdoor. If possible, implement an employee referral program. Employees will have a better insight to the day to day of the company and if they are compensated, are more likely to refer quality candidates.

Turning around your candidate experience will take some time on your part, but the result will be quality candidates genuinely interested in working for your company!


Learn how Sprockets’ predictive hiring solution for small businesses can help your company.

Two people discussing how to assess candidates before interviewing

3 Tips to Assess Candidates Before Interviewing

3 Tips to Assess Candidates Before Interviewing 2048 1302 Sprockets

The benefits of assessing a candidate’s skills before bringing them into an interview are absolutely endless. This process is often called a screening interview. While it is not an actual face-to-face interaction, the screening interview is the process of getting to know someone. This is done before meeting up with them and can have an impact on hiring decisions. Think of it kind of like researching a person before a blind date. No one wants to go into an interview—or a date—completely blind.

One of the many benefits of doing a little research is that you’ll be able to tailor your job interview questions. Tailored questions allow getting to know the candidate. Human connection cannot be manufactured, but it can be tailored. Knowing your candidate’s skills before going into the interview room gives you and your interviewee plenty to talk about in your meeting. No awkward silences here.

So what are some ways that leaders get to know their interview candidates before they actually speak in any capacity?

It sure isn’t through a resume.

While resumes are still a reasonable tool in their own right, resumes can be easily doctored to look impressive without saying a single word about who your candidate actually is. Hard and soft skill mastery is important. There is no way around that. However, just because a resume lists a manifest of duties and applications of those skills does not mean the employee actually completed those tasks masterfully. This is why assessing candidates is so important.

Cover letters attempted to rectify this conundrum. Yet cover letters are honestly just longer resumes. While they do expand on the skills and experiences listed, cover letters are so stock and tailored toward a stiff professionalism that employers do not get to see the person behind the experience. This raises red flags. There is no such thing as a perfect person, so why does this person seem flawless? Something does not add up.

For this reason, more and more hiring managers are moving away from resumes simply listing work experience to alternative methods of pre-interview screening. Try using these three tips in your recruiting and hiring process to find the right person for the job.

1. The Skills Test

If you are a traditionalist—or just a designer who loves to see what cool formats people create for their resumes—you can still have your potential candidates upload a resume to your application form. While we gave resumes a bit of a bad rap a second ago, resumes do make good complementary tools when used with other methods of assessment. We simply do not believe they should stand alone.

Have your candidates upload a resume with your application and use it as a quick check against your skill test data. If the data matches with the resume, congratulations, you might have a good candidate. However, if the candidate just squeaked by on the skills test and they claim they have excellent whatever skills, you might want to reconsider their integrity. Sometimes people underperform on skills tests due to an off day, but more likely than not, this inconsistency heralds a deeper character issue that you do not want affecting your company and won’t be a good cultural fit.

In that case, a resume can be a very helpful reference for further understanding of your skills test data.

Whether your industry is health insurance or mass producing tea cozies from your exploding Etsy shop, your employees are going to need a certain set of skills to help you grow your business into its next successful season. An automated skills test assesses candidates on the practical skills for the job.

Interviewers have used games, math puzzles, industry-specific questions, and other means to determine how candidates apply their skills. There are different matrices for generating data from these tests. Percentages are the most common for multiple choice answers.

Most employers have a minimum passing score in their tests to ensure only the best candidates get through. Oftentimes this percentage sits at 60%, but this is really subjective in nature. The passing rate for your candidates should correlate directly to how specific your job opportunity is.

2. The Personality Test

In addition to implementing a hard skills test to assess candidates, employers also like to have their potential interviewees take a personality test of some sort. Personality tests allow candidates to demonstrate subliminal personality traits—positive or negative traits of which they might not be aware—to give employers a better idea of the individual behind the skills.

Personality tests can be administered in many forms, and their data is very telling. While personality tests do not have any right or wrong answers, the way candidates answer certain team, or philosophy related, questions will give you a good idea of if they’ll fit into your company culture. Even more though, if the test you give them is in a game format and you are looking to see how well they work as a team, you will be looking to assess their scenario reaction more so than their overall success. Do they win the game because they do it all solo? Do they try to help their teammates overcome obstacles? Are they creative in collaboration? Do they rage quit when things heat up?

Newer predictive hiring solutions like Sprockets offer a way to easily assess candidates. We help companies decide who to hire based on their cultural and intellectual fit. Try us today for free! Check out this blog post on how pre-employment assessments lead to a positive, long-lasting relationship with candidates and employees.

While personality tests are never meant to be stand-alone qualifiers for a person’s ability to do a job, they do have many tells within their questions to let you know who is most apt to fit into your team.

3. Know Your Ideal Candidate

Our last piece of advice is to know your ideal candidate. Before you sit down to create your screening requirements for the open position, you need to assess just exactly what you are looking for. What position are you trying to fill? Why? Can you consolidate another position into this one? If so, do you even need to hire?

  • What qualities are you looking for?
  • Which skillset does the position require?
  • What would be a deal-breaker on a candidate for your company?
  • Why does your company need this candidate?

Knowing the answers to these questions will help you narrow down what to look for in interviews. This will allow you to tailor your questions and personality test to exactly what you are looking for.

The ideal candidate is going to know their stuff, be personable, and bring your company growth. Being specific, but flexible, on your pre-screening process will allow you the opportunity to see a diverse group of people.

Conclusion

Open-mindedly approaching the results of the tests is the key to finding the best job candidate. Sometimes, personality tests can lead business owners to think there is only one type of person who can fill a position in their work environment. However, using the personality test as a guide to understanding a person’s thought processes is much more effective than using it as a blanket identity. A person’s personality is forged through experience, and all habits—including weaknesses—can be strengthened with coaching, patience, and practice.

When you take the time to assess candidates, your fourth-quarter earnings will thank you.

A sign that reads "this must be the place"

The Modern Hiring Process Starts With a Great Job Posting

The Modern Hiring Process Starts With a Great Job Posting 900 500 Sprockets

When it’s time to hire, your job posting says everything about your company. Are you a dynamic, cutting edge company? Socially conscious? A digital dinosaur? Every communication is an opportunity to promote your organization, its culture, and values. Job postings can either attract top talent or send them yawning on to the next ad.

Like any marketing tool (and yes, you are marketing your company to the talent community) you’ll want to generate interest and even excitement. You know what’s great about working for you – you should be boasting it at every opportunity in the modern hiring process.

In today’s “unemployment is so low it’s making headlines” market, you need job postings that pull triple-duty: boosting your employer brand, finding the best applicant, and illustrating why that job seeker should look no further than your ad.

What’s in it for me?

Messaging must include what you have to offer as an employer as well as what you want from the candidate you hire. Get attention and interest by defining your company, the job and the candidate. Rather than looking for keywords that refine a job search, focus on “key” language that top talent associates with their skill set. Post for those to find the best match.

Keying in on key language

You know the qualifications and experience level you need. But you also know they’re not always predictors of success. Soft skills, emotional intelligence, and potential to learn and grow are important. They are often as important, if not more, than what’s on a candidate’s resume. Identifying the traits of top performers can help you search for those traits in candidates. And it goes both ways: highlighting key characteristics of your company can increase interest. Data suggests three quarters of workers would consider a pay cut to work for a responsible company. Your posting must key in on your corporate social responsibility.

When you quantify the shared characteristics of top performers, you know what to post for, what to interview for, and what to hire for. Is your company driven by innovative thinkers? Are meticulous, detail-oriented staffers your top performers? Whatever characteristics make for a successful employee, using those key terms can help you target the best applicants for a successful hire.

Focus on core values

Carefully choosing the wording of your posting speaks to the right candidate at the right time. Research shows some language dissuades candidates from applying. In the same way some language discourages candidates from applying, a strong job posting includes terms that encourage job seekers to see themselves in the role and quickly submit their resume. And seeing themselves in your company is important: one survey revealed the number one reason a candidate chooses one job over another is organizational culture. Recognizing traits as valuable to the organization as any other skill shows job seekers you’re a well-rounded company, looking to hire individuals, not just resumes.

Weighing your options

It’s easier to teach someone to code than to be a leader. When you know what soft skills are needed, it’s easier to make the right hire. You may even find a diamond in the rough. This would mean a candidate with all the characteristics you need who could be your next rock star. It all begins with a job posting that appeals to personality as much as qualifications.

Read the full E-Book, The Definitive Guide to Recruiting & Retaining Top Talent by clicking here.


Sprockets’ cost-effective Applicant Matching System (AMS) uncovers the traits that drive success for the top performers in your company. A great job posting, with these traits top-of-mind, optimizes your interview and hiring processes for the best chance of success. Contact us today.