Company Culture

A man and woman in an interview and text reading "Recruiting Employees vs. Finding the Right Fit"

The Difference Between Recruiting Employees and Finding the Right Fit

The Difference Between Recruiting Employees and Finding the Right Fit 1016 528 Sprockets

It’s time to evolve the way that everyone thinks about the hiring process. So, let’s start at the beginning: recruiting employees. One of the best ways to improve the recruiting process is to simply stop “recruiting.” 

That might sound counterintuitive, but you just need to look at it from a different perspective. While recruiting implies the generic practice of sourcing applicants for a job, “finding the right fit” is what we should really be doing. This takes recruiting a step further to source and screen applicants who are most likely to succeed and stay long-term.

Recruiting Employees vs. Finding the Right Fit

Whether you’re a hiring manager or a business owner, it’s important to stay up-to-date on the best hiring practices. Here’s a breakdown of how and why you should do it:

The Recruiting Process Is Outdated

Just because a certain way of doing something “works” doesn’t mean we should continue it. In fact, it’s essential to keep evolving, pursue better alternatives, and consider the paths less traveled. In this case, you should go beyond paying to post jobs on the same job boards, waiting for applications, and weeding through the endless list of resumes.

“Fit” Empowers Every Member of Your Team

When you focus more on finding the right fit and identifying the ideal soft skills, like communication and collaboration, you empower your entire team to succeed. These soft skills can often be more important than workplace skills or industry experience. A team member with several years of experience could be detrimental to the business by lacking the ideal personality traits, so it can be beneficial to consider applicants with little to no experience but have the right “fit.”

How to Identify Fit

Cellphones with fit scores to help with recruiting employeesIt can be difficult to identify the right personality traits via typical recruiting and screening practices, like interviews. Luckily, Sprockets’ AI-powered platform provides all the tools you need to find applicants who are the ideal fit for your team. You can post jobs for free to millions of hourly job seekers, send personality assessments with the click of a button, and see “fit scores” that automatically predict an applicant’s likelihood of success. The list goes on! 

Schedule a demo today to see how Sprockets can help you hire applicants who are the precise fit for your needs and improve employee retention.

Someone packing up their desk with text reading "How to Identify the Warning Signs of Employee Turnover"

How to Identify the Warning Signs of Employee Turnover

How to Identify the Warning Signs of Employee Turnover 1016 528 Sprockets

Employee turnover remains one of the most significant issues that businesses experience, especially in the restaurant and home health care industries. Turnover drains a company’s budget and time and affects overall productivity, but it can be difficult to manage.

Although there might not be a perfect solution that completely eliminates turnover, you can begin to combat the issue by learning to recognize certain red flags. Identifying the warning signs of employee turnover is essential to avoid staffing issues and ensure your business runs smoothly. It can also help you notice problems in the workplace and fix them, ultimately improving overall retention.

4 Common Warning Signs of Employee Turnover

1. Changes in Work Routines

When employees begin to miss deadlines or submit sub-par work, it may be an indication that they have started to check out. Each of us has a bad day from time to time, so you should address this issue with sensitivity to gauge the cause effectively. However, you should note apathy about missed deadlines and errors.

2. Absenteeism and Tardiness

When employees who are always punctual and never miss work start reporting to work late, leaving early, or asking for several sick days unexpectedly, something might be wrong. They could be modifying their schedule to meet with prospective employers or undergoing significant personal issues that could affect their mood. Either way, you should talk to them to understand punctuality changes and try to work with them to improve their situation in the workplace.

3. Change in Attitude 

If a team member who rarely complains starts to say negative things about their work or seems disgruntled, it could be an early sign of turnover. Their poor attitude and comments could also begin to negatively impact the rest of the team, ultimately reducing productivity and company culture.

4. Low Engagement

When friendly and talkative employees suddenly stop engaging with other workers, it could be another red flag. Breaking routines and leaving acquaintances and friends is one of the hardest parts people experience when leaving a company. Therefore, when you notice that employees have begun to pull away and remain quiet, they might be preparing to leave.

Reduce Costly Employee Turnover With Sprockets

A woman showing a laptop screen of the Sprockets hiring platformAnother major step toward improving retention is to implement Sprockets’ AI-powered solution to your hiring process. Our sophisticated software creates a unique success profile based on the mental makeup analysis of your current top-performing employees and gives applicants a “fit score” based on this benchmark. You’ll instantly see which applicants are worth interviewing, will succeed, mesh well with the team, and contribute to your company’s success.

A tired woman and text reading "The Top Reasons Why Employees Leave a Company"

The Top Reasons Why Employees Leave a Company

The Top Reasons Why Employees Leave a Company 1016 528 Sprockets

One of the best steps toward reducing employee turnover is to understand precisely what causes it. Some businesses, especially franchises in the QSR and home health care industries, experience particularly high turnover rates. The factors can vary, but we created a quick list of common reasons why employees leave their companies to help you improve retention.

6 Reasons Why Employees Leave Companies

You might think that low income is one of the leading causes of employee turnover. However, research has revealed that only 12% of workers quit their jobs because of money. Here are some of the top reasons why employees leave their companies:

1. Lack of Flexible Work Arrangements

Today, most employees want more flexible schedules. They no longer search for a typical 9:00 to 5:00 job, which requires them to stay in the office daily. They often choose to work for an organization that allows them to work remotely at least once per week. Our increasingly digital work environment gives us many reasons why we should enable our employees to work remotely.

If a company starts to offer a more lenient schedule, applicants might choose it over competitors. About 37% of workers would leave their companies for another organization that allows them to work remotely. Correspondingly, 82% would become more loyal to their employers if given a more flexible work schedule.

2. Lack of Appreciation

An employer’s failure to appreciate their workers is one of the significant causes of employee turnover. Employees want their performance noticed, especially when they put in extra effort or work additional hours. However, many employees feel undervalued or underappreciated, and 66% say they would leave their job due to lack of appreciation.

This number is high in millennial workers, as eight out of ten say they would quit their jobs if their present organizations do not appreciate them. A simple “great job” or “thank you” can help employees understand that managers value their efforts and contribute to improved retention.

3. Lack of Progress

Employees understand progression in different ways. For example, some may feel that they want a promotion or salary increase to progress, while others may define progress as acquiring new skills. It does not matter what they would like to work on, who they work with, or how the organization compensates them. When managers fail to give employees room to grow, they get tempted to search for new opportunities and leave companies. Employers should create career and educational advancement opportunities for staff.

4. Poor Workplace Culture

Overall workplace culture also determines employees’ length of stay. Corporate culture begins at the top, and it is one of the essential elements that contribute to employee retention. Although companies have different cultures, always ensure it gives employees a sense of belonging.

Workers appreciate an environment with transparent communication, clear direction, and respectable and approachable managers. An unwelcoming organizational culture is one of the top reasons for employee turnover. 47% of individuals who actively look for new jobs do so due to bad corporate culture.

5. Excessive Workload

Although employers might want to reward high achievers with more tasks, they must be careful when doing so. When employees get overwhelmed with their job’s demands, they tend to leave for other organizations that provide more manageable workloads. Managers should ensure that their teams have manageable workloads. If you increase an employee’s list of responsibilities, pair it with a promotion, salary increase, or other noticeable benefits.

6. Changes in Personal Life

A change in personal life is one of the reasons employees leave a company, but it’s one that it’s difficult to avoid as a manager. For example, a worker may relocate to a new country for themselves or family members. Additionally, changes in their health can cause an employee to quit their job or look for a more accommodating position. While you do not have control over changes in employees’ personal lives, you can always support them in the workplace and through any major transitions.

Reduce Employee Turnover With Our AI-Powered Solution

A woman on a laptop hiring applicants with no industry experienceAlthough employees quit their jobs for various reasons, paying close attention to these factors can potentially help retain your best talent. And, when crew members inevitably leave, Sprockets makes it easy to find new workers that perform like your best employees.

Our sophisticated hiring solution combines artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and over 80 years of psychological research to predicts an applicant’s likelihood to succeed and stay long-term. Building the best team, and saving time and money, is as simple as adding our brief survey to your recruiting process. Sprockets even has an easy-to-use platform and integrates with other major hiring tools!

A woman with a headset and text reading "Maintaining Morale in the Workplace After Employees Leave"

Here’s How to Maintain Morale in the Workplace After Employees Leave

Here’s How to Maintain Morale in the Workplace After Employees Leave 1016 528 Sprockets

It’s inevitable for employees to leave workplaces, whether it’s for them to pursue another opportunity or their manager decided to let them go. However, when influential employees leave, the remaining team members may get frustrated about the situation or worry about their own position. These negative emotions might lead to low morale and reduced productivity. Leaders must then apply their skills to rejuvenate the workplace culture and positive atmosphere.

8 Ways to Boost Morale and Motivation in the Workplace

If you’re a manager, especially in the QSR or home health care industries, you likely deal with a high rate of employee turnover. Therefore, it’s crucial to know how to rebuild team morale after an employee — or several — employees leave, whether voluntarily or involuntarily.

Here are some strategies to maintain morale in the workplace after employees leave:

1. Re-Affirm the Team’s Vision and Goals

When employees leave their workplace, some rumbling in the workplace might occur as the remaining workforce might wonder about the future of the business. The remaining labor force needs reassurance that the company will still meet its long-term goals and be successful. Remind the team about the company’s vision and the significant roles they all play in that.

2. Be Open and Transparent

If you decide to let employees go, the remaining team members might wonder why you came to such a decision. In most situations, it is alright to provide an explanation and invite any questions or concerns your employees might have. This can put them at ease about their job security and workplace environment. 

(When informing the team about the reasons for termination, ensure that the engagement is a one-on-one meeting with open-ended questions. However, you might not be able to share all the contract’s termination details due to legal requirements in the state.)

3. Praise Employees for Their Contributions

The remaining team needs to be made feel appreciated for their contributions toward meeting the company’s short-term and long-term goals. As you commend their work, you need to put it appropriately for them to see the sincerity in the appreciation. Some people give their best in every team, and they need recognition through awards or recognition. Such credit will create a humane picture in the remaining employees’ minds, and they will remain focused on meeting the company’s goals.

4. Treat Laid-Off Employees With Respect and Dignity

If you have to terminate an employee for any reason, make sure you follow the due process and do so respectfully. If you handle a firing or layoff poorly, the ill-treatment will only create resentment within the remaining labor force. The remaining labor force will be less disgruntled if their former colleagues get treatment full of respect and dignity even as they leave.

5. Lighten Workers’ Mood

Buying free lunch or morning coffee for the remaining staff may improve the workplace’s mood. The company may also opt to take the workers for a trip or a social outing. During the event, the management should freely interact with the remaining employees. It might be a good opportunity to communicate why the decision was necessary and the next step the team will take to reach their goals together.

6. Emphasize Work-Life Balance

Management should create time for the employees to enjoy their social life with their families to increase their morale and prevent burnout. The administration can promote work-life balance by coming up with flexible schedules and remote working opportunities. Management should also avoid engaging workers while they are outside the workplace.

7. Organize Team-Building Activities

One of the most common ways to create a positive relationship between managers and their teams is to schedule team-building activities. Team-building creates collaborative cultures among teams, which is necessary after a significant layoff at work. If you are looking towards maintaining morale in the workplace after employees leave, a team-building initiative is one of the approaches to adopt.

8. Address the Workload Burden

Whenever workers leave, there is an unallocated workload that will have to be shared by the remaining staff if there is no immediate replacement. Adding extra work could cause resentment. If you are firing some employees, consider having them replaced as soon as possible. If the workload is to be re-distributed to the remaining workforce, consider informing them positively. You might want to consider even adding something to their paycheck.

Improve Retention and Team Morale With Sprockets

Two happy employees in a kitchenOne of the best ways to avoid the reduced morale associated with employee turnover is to hire the right applicants in the first place. Sprockets’ AI-powered solution predicts an applicant’s likelihood to succeed like your current top-performers, fit well with the existing team, and stay long-term. Users experience a 43% improvement in retention, on average!

Schedule a brief demo today to see how it works and start building the ideal team. You’ll save valuable time and money during the recruitment process and see an increase in overall productivity.

An unhappy man and text reading "How Employee Turnover Affects the Customer Experience"

How Employee Turnover Affects the Customer Experience

How Employee Turnover Affects the Customer Experience 1016 528 Sprockets

Business managers and human resource professionals must fully understand the effects of employee turnover. It disrupts scheduling practices, causes productivity slips, hurts company morale, wastes valuable time, and costs money.

However, one of the most significant consequences is the negative impact employee turnover has on customer service. The loss of long-term, top-performing employees means the loss of leadership, institutional knowledge, and rapport with customers. Experienced and seasoned employees, who understand the needs of customers, are in a better position to serve them.

The Effects of Employee Turnover on Customers

They Feel Less Valued

Businesses of all sizes should understand how employee turnover affects the customer experience. Whether it’s greeting them by name or knowing their favorite order, customers feel valued when employees understand them and their preferences. However, they can easily feel undervalued or unappreciated if there are always new employees at your location who lack the information or time to go above and beyond like this.

They Get Impatient

Employee turnover can lead to a loss of efficiency and productivity. New employees need time to understand a company’s business policies and procedures, how to solve problems, and meet expectations. Customer satisfaction depends on fast and friendly customer service, and it can be compromised by errors, repeated questions, or delays.

They Don’t Return

Repeat customers can significantly increase the ROI and reputation of your business. They provide you with consistent income and become loyal supporters, recommending your company to several other potential consumers. However, employee turnover can damage customer loyalty and even prevent people from becoming repeat visitors. A customer who receives poor service due to negative workplace culture or overloaded employees resulted from turnover might never come back to your store after an initial purchase.

How to Improve Retention and Customer Satisfaction

A waiter providing good customer serviceIt’s crucial to hire the ideal applicants to mitigate the negative effects of employee turnover. Many successful businesses use pre-employment assessments to screen applicants and make the right hiring decisions.

That’s where Sprockets comes into the equation. Our AI-powered hiring solution predicts an applicant’s likelihood to succeed and stay long-term based on the success profile of your current top-performing employees. Numerous franchisees across a variety of industries have reduced costly turnover with Sprockets. You could be next!

A tired worker and text reading "How Employee Turnover Affects the Rest of Your Team"

The Effects of Employee Turnover on the Rest of Your Team

The Effects of Employee Turnover on the Rest of Your Team 1016 528 Sprockets

Losing an employee costs time and money, but you also must consider the effects of turnover on the rest of your team. It can negatively impact company culture, productivity, and overall satisfaction for both managers and employees. Let’s dive into the various ways turnover can hurt your business and discuss the best options for avoiding them.

How Employee Turnover Affects Your Team

The Employee Experience

First of all, a lackluster recruiting process that results in new hires that don’t fit the company culture, or are otherwise unqualified, puts stress on the current team. Existing team members lose time with their direct manager to the interview and onboarding processes. The time spent on the hiring process is generally carved away from the time managers would typically spend developing their current teams. Administrative and other time-sensitive tasks will likely take precedent over the current team’s development needs. Many development opportunities are lost, and existing employees may feel less valued.

As the poorly placed employee moves toward their eventual exit, the core employee base is forced to take on a heavier workload. In the case of absenteeism, employees must pick up more slack. In the case of poor performance, they face more work in the form of both rework and time spent resolving a series of poor customer experiences caused by poorly performing coworkers.

The Manager Experience

This redirection of energy can negatively impact the manager’s experience at work as well. The loss of development time is not just a problem for their employees. The process of creating relationships while developing individuals and teams is the primary source of professional growth for a manager. When this process is neglected, managers don’t have opportunities to build upon their coaching skill set. The team’s performance improvement efforts will suffer, and the drag on productivity will worsen. Now, the manager faces a new-hire learning curve as well as a slower improvement process for the existing team. 

Company Culture

Another consideration is the impact on a company’s culture. Most companies are very conscious of the culture they are trying to create. Creating an environment in which teams are positioned to perform well requires a lot of education and reinforcement. Consistent reinforcement provides the traction needed for a positive culture to be formed and, consequently, take on momentum. A constant stream of departures and replacements makes the task infinitely harder than it already is.

All great cultures are about creating a sense of team as well as the belief that employees have a productive place to work and perform. When employees experience turnover around them, they tend to doubt both elements. They are faced with the tasks of rebuilding a positive team dynamic and learning to trust new team members. In the case of voluntary attrition, employees will wonder whether their environment is as good as they believe it to be. They might assume people are leaving for better opportunities and working conditions. This is a real risk to the state of employee morale.

Reduce Employee Turnover With Sprockets

Two men shaking hands at a restaurantYour hiring process has a significant influence on employee retention. The challenge is to differentiate between the factors that bring the strong, consistent performers and those that result in poor fits. By focusing on logic, data, and decision quality, you can mitigate the impact of employee turnover on company morale, culture, and productivity.

This is where Sprockets can help. Our AI-powered software predicts the likelihood that applicants will fit with your company’s culture and perform similarly to your most valued employee base. The combination of artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and over 80 years of psychological research ensures that hiring managers make consistent, high-quality decisions. These decisions will play a huge role in slowing the churn in the employee base and allow teams to get back to the business of development and innovation.

Start hiring the ideal applicants and improving retention with Sprockets today!

Two smiling women and text reading "10 tips for Creating a Positive Company Culture"

10 Tips for Creating a Positive Company Culture

10 Tips for Creating a Positive Company Culture 1016 528 Sprockets

Franchise company culture plays a large role in a company’s success. A positive company culture will encourage employees to work harder and stay with your company longer. Employees will also look for ways to help the business become more efficient and more profitable. When your people are happy, they pass the savings onto you. Here are some tips on how to create a positive company culture.

Here’s How to Create a Positive Company Culture

1. Prioritize Health

The world has recently come out of a pandemic, and health is more important to employees than ever. If you want to create a positive company culture, you need to make employees feel safe and healthy. Do this by providing adequate health insurance for full-time employees. People should get their insurance within 3 to 6 months after their start date. You should also encourage employees to work from home when they aren’t feeling well. Finally, you should make sure employees have plenty of physical space between each other. You can also install hand sanitizer stations and reminders on how to stay healthy. Healthy employees show up to work more and work harder. 

2. Use Standardized Metrics to Measure Performance 

Employees need to feel that there are fair metrics in place to judge their progress at work. You can gauge things based on productivity, sales, or a number of other metrics. Make them clear to everyone. You should also make it clear how you calculate the metrics so that employees understand what they need to do to help you gather accurate data. This helps you learn what your employees are doing every day and how much they can accomplish. You can use the data to adjust the metrics as you see fit. 

3. Get to Know Employees 

You need to make a point to get to know your employees on a personal basis. You can do this with casual meetings in both a group and one-on-one setting. You can have other meetings to talk about performance. These meetings should involve learning what motivates your employees and their thoughts about working for you. If meetings aren’t your style, make an effort to get out into the workspace to answer questions and help when the real work is going on. You will be able to show your expertise while getting to watch your employees in action. 

4. Request Feedback 

Running a company can mean that you focus on the big-picture ideas as opposed to the day-to-day operations of your organization. You may not be able to properly see the things that could use improvement. Who better to suggest improvements than the people who work there every day? Provide an anonymous suggestion box or anonymous surveys to allow people to express their thoughts. You can also establish an open-door policy that gives people the chance to voice any concerns to you in person when a certain problem comes up. 

5. Encourage Diversity 

People have struggled and worked for years to become equal to other people simply due to their skin tone, country of origin, gender, sexuality, or age. As the leader of your organization, you need to go out of your way to create an environment of inclusion. Start by hiring a professional who can consult on ways to increase inclusion in your business. If you do notice any form of discrimination, it needs to be taken seriously. Investigate all complaints immediately. Establish clear consequences for anyone who hinders your efforts of diversity and harmony. 

6. Recognize Hard Work

Many employees don’t feel adequately appreciated in their current position. When you see an employee doing a good job, you should make a point to celebrate their efforts. Acknowledge them in a public way. You can also give them some sort of monetary reward for going above and beyond. Hopefully, other employees will be encouraged to work hard, too. 

7. Create Clear Core Values 

When you clarify what your company stands for, these values can guide you in the right direction during your daily dilemmas. Make sure that all employees in your company know your core values, too. The idea is to get them to go through the workday with those same values instilled in them. Write your core values down, go over them during orientation, and reiterate them once or twice a year while also placing reminders around the workspace, whether it’s an office or a restaurant.

8. Promote From Within

Many employees don’t appreciate being at a job for years only to watch someone else come in at a higher position who doesn’t know the ins and outs of the company. You should only hire people that you can see promoting down the line at some point. Instead of hiring C-level employees, you can promote within and hire entry-level employees to train. Always keep your eyes open for who is truly making an effort at the company.

9. Set Standards 

You want your employees to like you, but you also want your employees to behave in an appropriate manner. Establish standards and hold people to them. If you let employees get away with anything, they will do just about anything. Some common expectations include regular attendance, proper customer service, and appropriate behavior in the office. Establish consequences when an employee does not meet your expectations, and stick to them. 

10. Have Fun

Just because you are at work does not mean you can’t have any fun. It’s okay to joke around with employees and let employees joke and laugh and have fun. Encourage social outings after work and allow people to be silly. For some workplace culture examples, you can even provide games in the break room or ice-cream socials once a month. These little extras can make an employee want to stay. 

Hire Applicants Who Will Contribute to a Positive Environment

Two men shaking hands at a restaurantOne of the best ways to create and maintain a positive company culture is to hire people who will help make it happen. Luckily, Sprockets empowers you to do precisely that. Our sophisticated solution to hiring combines natural language with artificial intelligence and over 80 years of psychological research to predict which applicants will succeed at your company and mesh well with your team. It’s not magic — it’s logic.

Schedule a demo today to see how the Sprockets solution works!

Two people in an interview at a restaurant and text reading "Why Applicants With No Experience Can Be Quality Hires"

Why Applicants With No Industry Experience Can Be Quality Hires

Why Applicants With No Industry Experience Can Be Quality Hires 1016 528 Sprockets

While it is understandable that one would prefer to work with an employee who already understands industry jargon, is familiar with the proper tools, and has a grasp on what the job entails, these hiring criteria might only benefit you in the more senior positions. However, when trying to fill hourly or even entry-level positions, hiring candidates with no industry experience might lead to a better quality hire in the long run. 

When faced with a mountain of resumes, it makes sense to focus on candidates with a proven record in the industry. However, multiple reports, such as this one by Glassdoor, say that this might not always be the case. You might actually end up missing out on the ideal applicants. Below, we discuss five important reasons why you should pick potential over experience:

5 Reasons to Hire Applicants With No Industry Experience

1. They Are Adaptable: Newbies are moldable, unlike someone who has done the same tasks and solved the same issues in a different organization. An experienced person will not question or examine strategies, status quos, or processes with fresh eyes. They tend to be cookie-cutters who follow the same standard procedure that they’ve always used.

Currently, all industries are facing uncertainty. There has never been a time when organizations needed change or coping skills as much as they do now. Unfortunately, an employee who has spent a significant amount of time fixated on the same role, facing similar challenges and using the same thought process to come to solutions, will need intense training to re-imagine or rethink a task. Choosing to bring new and unexplored talent — people who have yet to develop habits and routine practices — will present you with employees who respond positively to changes, adapt seamlessly to new company culture, and seek new solutions and opportunities.

2. They Bring Fresh Talent and Perspectives: While experience is valuable, companies are now more focused on diversifying their culture and hiring employees with a wide range of skills. Culture is ever-changing, and the younger generation is at the forefront of it. Hiring fresh talent will introduce new ideas and perspectives that align with the current market trends and expectations. People who’ve done the same or similar jobs over and over tend to fall into a mental rut. Similarly, your interviews will be more enlightening and exciting. Not only will you grow in the process of hiring newcomers in your industry, but you might land the brilliant, energetic employee you always wished for.

3. They Are Passionate: When you’re accustomed to the same routine and job, your curiosity tends to dip. Taking a chance on someone without experience and training them can help motivate them to remain passionate and loyal to your organization. New employees without experience are usually eager to learn and impress if only to affirm your decision in hiring them. Experienced employees will probably tell you how they will accomplish the job in the same guaranteed approach, without expressing interest in learning what makes your company unique. Candidates who have been in the industry for years sometimes tend to be the least creative, especially if you’re looking for someone who can rethink and improve upon an idea or a function.

On the other hand, an entirely new candidate in your industry has innate curiosity, positivity, and passion. Along with the feeling of accomplishment, these traits will rub off on other employees, which might end up positively impacting your organization’s productivity.

4. They’re the Future: Bringing in a new candidate with no prior experience, while challenging, can help foster innovative ideas. You get the opportunity to train them to fill the role the way you want it to be. Additionally, watching your new hire transform right before your eyes into a full-fledged professional is both rewarding and inspiring.

5. They Bring Diversity: Diversity and inclusion are vital in any organization. A diverse workplace yields higher revenue growth as well as increased employee retention. A diverse team improves morale and allows for exchanging ideas from different demographics, leading to out-of-the-box solutions.

Find the Right Applicant With the Right Recruitment Solution

A woman on a laptop hiring applicants with no industry experienceHiring young talent is not only refreshing to your organization, but it’s also an opportunity for growth and better ideas. You will develop a positive company culture of inclusion, challenge your thinking, and open pathways to innovative ideas, which might be the best thing you ever do.

This hiring process can be difficult, but not with Sprockets. To ensure you hire the right candidate, Sprockets offers personality tests for the interview process to ensure you find the right candidate. Our sophisticated solution combines technology and psychology to find applicants with a similar mental makeup as your current top-performing employees, ultimately reducing costly turnover. Schedule a brief demo today to see it in action!

A team of restaurant employees talking about the importance of recruiting for personality

The Importance of Recruiting for Personality: Everything You Need to Know

The Importance of Recruiting for Personality: Everything You Need to Know 1016 528 Sprockets

What matters more to you when hiring: the applicants’ personality or the skills in their CVs? A study revealed that 78% of professionals from various industries agreed that personality is the most crucial factor when hiring. These employers cited the initial skillset as the least important factor. Many employers want to find people who will mesh well with their values and cultures.

Why Should You Recruit for Personality?

According to Leadership IQ’s study that involved about 20,000 companies, 46% of new employees quit their jobs or fail within one and a half years. Also, a whopping 89% of those failures were due to attitudinal reasons. You can imagine the cost these companies incurred due to high employee turnover. So, assessing your applicants’ personality rewards you with the following benefits:

1. Boost Employee Engagement: If a person’s preferences and interests fit a job, they’ll keep them engaged over a long period in the workplace. As an employer, you’ll want to know your potential employee’s engagement level in the job. People who enjoy doing their tasks are more likely to derive satisfaction from their jobs. Consequently, they’ll gladly welcome opportunities for growth and development in their careers. As such, expect improved on-the-job performance, which will boost the overall success of your business. 

Your business needs people that will freely share ideas and forge robust cooperation. However, it’s nearly impossible to determine if a potential employee can interact positively with your customers and other employees before hiring them. That’s where an employee personality assessment becomes useful. You can determine an applicants’ social skills with a quick personality test.

2. Increase Employee Success and Job Performance: Pre-employment personality assessments can give you powerful insights into a candidate’s future success at the workplace. If you’re looking for employees that will post stellar performance in your business, the assessments will help you identify desirable personality traits.

These traits include professionalism, high energy, confidence, self-monitoring, empathy, etc. You can rest assured you’ll reduce your employee turnover by recruiting for traits such as these. Your workforce will tend to stay positive in their jobs and improve performance.

3. Reduce the Cost of Bad Hires: You win some and lose some, but it’s expensive to hire badly. So, strive to hire more people with the right personality. While a typical profit-and-loss spreadsheet will never reveal bad hires, evidence shows that low employee retention is among the factors that hurt corporate profitability. According to research, a company can incur 50% to 400% of an employee’s annual salary if that employee leaves. 

What Are Some of the Crucial Personality Traits to Look for in a Candidate?

When arming yourself with personality tests for your applicants, be sure you identify all the ideal traits that fit the target positions. Here are the most common qualities to test:

  • Professionalism: This trait includes a person’s attitude, behavior, and conduct in a business or work environment. You want people who conduct their jobs in a way that preserves and even boosts your company’s image.
  • High energy: An employee with high motivation will work their tail off to bring maximum value to your business. They’re usually highly engaged, proactive, energized, driven, focused, and coachable.
  • Confidence: Having technical skills is one thing, but demonstrating confidence in your skills to solve an issue is another thing. Does your candidate believe in themselves and their ability to serve clients, interact with other employees, and push your business forward?
  • Self-monitoring: Don’t hire a person that will laze around and scamper to their duties when they see you or their superior. Go for those who value the company’s time, know how to use their skills for particular tasks, and self-monitor their improvement. Such breeds don’t need high levels of supervision. 
  • Team-player: While one person can move quickly, your company requires team players if you’re looking to grow. Employees who easily collaborate among themselves will brainstorm on ideas, solve problems together, and support each other for common goals.
  • Empathy: A highly empathetic personality strives to cultivate curiosity about strangers, discover commonalities, listen well, and try to understand another person’s situation. They also have ambitious imaginations. Hire empathetic people to wow your clients, surrounding community, fellow employees, suppliers, and other stakeholders. 

How Personality Assessments Can Help Pin-Point the Right Candidates

Employee personality tests aim to determine attitudinal and other traits. Most modern tests, like Sprockets’, employ a combination of psychology and technology to identify red flags. Forward-thinking companies understand the importance of hiring for personality and embrace these psychology-backed assessments. They’ve realized that relying on gut feelings and CVs alone can only take them so far.

The icing on the cake is that you can get the testing done within just a few minutes using a desktop or mobile device. You can then use the results to assess how applicants will fit with your business culture. With these personality assessment tests, you’ll get all sorts of relevant information concerning your applicants, like their:

  • Level of emotional intelligence
  • Work ethic
  • Reliability
  • Score in terms of the big five personality dimensions: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness, and agreeableness

Would you like to customize the tests to meet your specific wants and needs? These psychology assessments can handle that too. 

Hire the Right Fit With Sprockets!

A woman showing a laptop screen of the Sprockets hiring platformThere’s more to hiring the perfect candidate than experience and skills. Hiring someone with the right personality is crucial to the company’s success. While skills can be taught, having the right attitude, passion, and eagerness for a field cannot. Focusing on the candidate’s personality is vital to ensure a healthy work culture and employee engagement amongst team members. The wrong personality and attitude issues can impair workplace morale, draining your energy, resources, and time. Eventually, negative traits can drive away your hard-earned customers and top performers. 

Do you find it hard hiring the right fit for your business work culture? At Sprockets, pinpointing the perfect match is our business. Request a demo now and see how we can bring value to your business. 

A smiling businesswoman, spreading positivity in the workplace

The Power of Positivity in the Workplace

The Power of Positivity in the Workplace 1024 512 Sprockets

A positive outlook has a major impact in the workplace. From hiring to retaining employees, a positive attitude by management can make all the difference. In fact, Glassdoor reported that 35% of employers who hire new employees do so expecting that more will quit within the year. If employee retention is an issue at your business, don’t forget to start at the beginning because positivity in the workplace can make all the difference. 

If you’re looking for help in your hiring process, Sprockets’ Applicant Matching System can ensure you only hire the right matches for your business. 

In order to retain employees, you can be a skeptical optimist. By wanting to believe that your new hires will stick around, you’re more likely to put in the extra effort to keep them around. This turns into a ripple effect. When you treat employees with a positive attitude and gratitude, they will have a positive feeling towards the business. Employees who feel a deeper connection to a business are more likely to stay longer. 

In addition, a positive workplace has effects beyond employee retention. Employees with a positive attitude are found to have the characteristics outlined below.

  • Positive employees are more productive, proven by this study.
  • Employees who are known for a positive attitude are typically more engaged.
  • Those who have a positive outlook are good role models for other employees.
  • People with positive attitudes get sick less often.

How to Spread Positivity in the Workplace

  • Be respectful

No matter the position of the employee, be respectful! If they’re having a stressful day, don’t just brush it off. Lend an ear and proactively work towards a solution together. This will aid in employee retention.

  • Attitude of gratitude

Always show gratitude for your employees! Whether it’s a thank you note around the holidays or special recognition for a job well done, don’t take your employees for granted. When people feel appreciated, they are more likely to be happy in their position and with the organization.

  • Be receptive to feedback

It’s one thing to ask for feedback and another to be receptive. When you show employees that you appreciate their feedback and take action on it, you convey that you care.

Overall, if you begin your hiring process with a positive outlook, the ripple effect will have a great effect on your business. From productive employees to increased employee retention, do your best to see the best in your workforce and support them.